Tag Archives: PaaS

Four Point DevOps Story

Build team interest and passion in DevOps by promoting four DevOps themes:

  1. DevOps PaaS Delivers at the Speed of Business Demand
  2. DevOps Equals DevOps Principles Plus DevOps Practices
  3. The Agile DevOps PaaS Mindset
  4. ALM PaaS Bridges the Dev Gap

Every team member desires to fulfill their objective while delivering  at the Speed of Business DemandHigh performance IT teams move at the speed of business.

They rapidly deliver high quality software solutions that enable business penetration into new markets, create innovative products, and improve customer experience and retention. Unfortunately, most IT teams do not have an environment fostering the rapid iteration, streamlined workflow, and effective collaboration required to operate at the speed of now and capture business opportunity. Disconnected tooling, static environment deployment, and heavyweight governance across development and operations often impede rapid software cycles, minimize delivery visibility, and prohibit innovative experimentation.

A new, more responsive IT model is required!  

A more responsive IT model incorporates  DevOps Principles Plus DevOps Practices.

Every successful, long-lasting model has a clear manifesto outlining goals and principles. Many DevOps adopters may not be aware of the DevOps Manifesto (created by Jez Humble @jezhumble) nor how successful DevOps requires keeping a clear focus on principles, practices, and value (instead of infrastructure tooling.

When teams converge agile and DevOps practices with Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) infrastructure, they adopt an agile DevOps PaaS mindset.  They create a collaborative environment that accelerates business enablement and increases customer engagement. Adopting agile devops requires a structural mind shift, and successful IT teams follow manifesto guidance to change delivery dynamics, take small steps to build one team, focus on real deliverables, accelerate reactive adaptation, and guide continuous loop activity.

Effective cross-functional teams drive every big success. Whether bridging dev with ops or biz with dev, encourage self-organizing teams and value small daily interactions.

ALM PaaS bridges the development gap between corporate IT and distributed outsourced development activities. The traditional gap impedes system integration, user acceptance testing, visibility into project progress, and corporate governance. Stephen Withers describes an often true, and ineffective current ALM state:

” the CIO does not have visibility of the overall project: this is a major problem.”

A top CIO desire is to obtain portfolio-wide visibility into development velocity, operational efficiency, and application usage.

What solution or best practices do you see solving balkanized, silo development tooling, fractured governance, disconnected workflow, and incomplete status reporting when working with distributed outsourced teams or across internal teams?

Recommended Reading

  1. DevOps PaaS Delivers at the Speed of Business Demand
  2. DevOps Equals DevOps Principles Plus DevOps Practices
  3. The Agile DevOps PaaS Mindset
  4. ALM PaaS Bridges the Dev Gap

 

pressreleasepoint.com.shadowIT

Embrace Shadow IT Clouds

Cloud is the new shadow IT for enterprises. While stable, well-known SaaS offerings such as Salesforce or Netsuite are excellent paths forward,  unregulated, shadow IT cloud deployments often expand  business risk and magnify IT inefficiencies.   According to a recent TechRepublic report, shadow IT departments can create major fiscal problems for businesses using the cloud.  A PressReleasepoint.com release points to the source of increasing shadow IT cloud deployments:

Leasing cloud servers and subscribing to applications is incredibly easy. There is no reason why a business manager, customer service representative or other non-technical employee cannot quickly establish a cloud deal and start using an application because he or she thinks it will get the job done effectively. This is precisely why IT oversight is necessary.

Shadow IT teams gain faster time to market and decrease delivery hurdles by running home-brewed business critical systems on AWS, Heroku, Cloudbees, Azure and other cloud platforms. Often enterprise IT only discovers Cloud systems existence when the Shadow IT project requires access to  enterprise system data or services.

To co-exist with Shadow IT and maximize Cloud efficiency and productivity,  align corporate IT policy, architecture, operations, and support with innovative, shadow IT projects . Are you an expert at working with Shadow IT?

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managed cloud

The Flight to Managed Cloud

 

Teams adopting Cloud strive for a perfect balance between high control, easy adoption, and economies of scale.  Both private and public cloud options often do not overcome significant adoption barriers, and hybrid cloud today represents a fatalistic acceptance of sophisticated environment heterogeneity, increased integration burden, and fractured policy enforcement.   Project owners desire a cloud flight path that does not require retraining team members, fulfills complex enterprise requirements, and delivers DevOps best practice with minimal investment. Managed clouds provide a straightforward transition path, cost effective adoption model, and expert implementation assistance.

 

A managed cloud delivers a private, off-premise, bespoke Cloud managed by a third-party service provider.  By blending DevOps practices, policy-driven configuration, expert management, and Cloud infrastructure, a managed cloud environment exhibits high on-demand scalability, flexible self-service, and affordable pay-as-you go pricing.

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WSO2 App Factory

DevOps PaaS delivers at the speed of business demand

High performance IT teams move at the speed of business. They rapidly deliver high quality software solutions that enable business penetration into new markets, create innovative products, and improve customer experience and retention.  Unfortunately, most IT teams do not have an environment fostering the rapid iteration, streamlined workflow, and effective collaboration required to operate at the speed of now and capture business opportunity. Disconnected tooling, static environment deployment, and heavyweight governance across development and operations often impede rapid software cycles, minimize delivery visibility, and prohibit innovative experimentation.

A new, more responsive IT model is required.

Continue reading

Apache Stratos

Why Apache Stratos

Apache Stratos  is an Open Platform as a Service (PaaS) framework project supported by the Apache community.  Apache Stratos brings enterprise-ready quality of service, governance, security, and performance to internal private clouds, externally managed clouds, and public clouds. Enterprise organizations, Cloud infrastructure vendors, and Cloud service providers may freely modify, distribute, and deploy Apache Stratos without any intellectual property restrictions, royalties, or fees.

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Collaborative

ALM PaaS Bridges the Dev Gap

ALM PaaS bridges the development gap between corporate IT and distributed outsourced development activities.  The traditional gap impedes system integration, user acceptance testing, visibility into project progress, and corporate governance. Stephen Withers describes an often true, and ineffective current ALM state:

” the CIO does not have visibility of the overall project: this is a major problem.”

A top CIO desire is to obtain portfolio-wide visibility into development velocity, operational efficiency, and application usage.

What solution or best practices do you see solving balkanized, silo development tooling, governance, workflow, and status reporting across distributed outsourced teams?  Does your desired solution integrate with tools a CIO’s outsourced organizations  are using?

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Reducing Cloud Computing Cost

Warning: Cloud projects may cost more than terrestrial projects. Cloud projects may not reduce IT cost.    Unless, you carefully consider appropriate Cloud usage scenarios, build Cloud-aware solutions, and choose Cloud-native platforms.

Jared Wray (@jaredwray) has obviously been thinking about Cloud’s value proposition, market awareness, and end-user adoption scenarios. Jared has penned an excellent post on Cloud computings hidden costs that delivers in-depth analysis on Cloud computing dynamics.

Many news writers have documented cloud’s hidden cost, for example Beth Pariseau (@pariseauTT) at SeachCloudCOmputing documenting cloud sticker shock.    Beth outlines a key areas to watch:

  • Server instance performance
  • Provisioning cost
  • Data storage cost
  • Distaster recovery,  monitoring, and network bandwidth

Why Be Concerned About Cloud Cost?

Archana Venkatraman (@archanatweets) posts in ComputerWeekly that a

global survey of CIOs into attitudes and concerns relating to cloud computing has revealed that almost 80% are concerned about the hidden costs associated with cloud computing.

Adding to the conversation, Joe Mckendrick (@joemckendrick) details specific points of concern:

  • Poor end user experience due to performance bottlenecks (64 percent). This goes right to the customer end-user experience as well, since e-commerce is the leading cloud application area, the survey finds  – 78 percent of respondents are already using cloud resources to support e-commerce.
  • The impact of poor performance on brand perception and customer loyalty (51 percent).
  • Loss of revenue due to poor availability, performance, or troubleshooting cloud services (44 percent).
  • Increased costs of resolving problems in a more complex environment (35 percent).
  • Increased effort required to manage vendors and service level agreements (23 percent).

Correlating hidden cost fears,  IBM’s recent admission that  Cloud Foundry demand is “in its infancy” (reported by Joe Curtis  @JoeCurtis_CBR), and a 2013 summer story of lagging Enterprise PaaS adoption, many  IT professionals may predict that

PaaS may be poised to enter the trough of disillusionment.

The Smart Cloud Path Forward

Fortunately, smart tech leaders are presenting a viable path forward.  A path that jumps over the disillusionment gulf.  I especially appreciate Jared’s statement,

most savings come when users take advantage of the platform to optimize their workloads. 

When workloads and the platform may become Cloud-aware, Cloud solutions can live up to the hype.  Successful teams optimize code, configuration, and policy to capitalize on Cloud-native architecture and capabilities.   Rather than a ‘Bigger in Texas’ design mentality, a frugal, just-enough at the right time, design must pervade the Cloud solution.   I would like to see the industry move towards benchmarking how multi-tenant design effects ‘tenant density’ (tenant count divided by granularity), scaling time lag, and solution cost.

Reducing Cloud Computing Cost: Recommended Reading

PaaS TCO and PaaS ROI: hared multi-tenant container PaaS 

Building Multi-Tenant SaaS Applications 

Cloud-Native PaaS Architecture

Hidden Cost of Cloud Computing  (Joe Mckendrick)

Where is the Rub: Cloud Computings Hidden Costs (Jared Wray)

 

Creating a SaaS App with the Multi-Tenant Carbon Framework – Step 1

When using traditional application servers and integration middleware, developing a multi-tenant SaaS application that meets SaaS requirements (i.e. personalization, tenant dimensions, self-service, resource optimization, and data aggregation) is a non-trivial exercise.  The prior blog post in this SaaS series describes the requirements and constraints for SaaS applications.

Because WSO2 Carbon based middleware servers contain a tenancy framework, development teams may rapidly migrate single-tenant web applications into multi-tenant SaaS applications.  WSO2 Carbon creates a multi-tenant environment inside the middleware servers (i.e. application server, integration server, Enterprise Service Bus) and delivers unparalleled tenant density.   For more information on the cost and effort savings, read the multi-tenant, shared container PaaS white paper.

The WSO2 Carbon framework creates tenant partitions, registers tenant specific applications, provides tenant administration tools, and holds run-time tenant context.

In this blog post series, we will deploy a tenant-aware SaaS application on the WSO2 Application Server 5.1, illustrate how to acquire the Carbon Context object, and demonstrate multi-tenancy in action.  The WSO2 Application Server is based on Apache Tomcat, and extends Tomcat with enterprise security, logging, management, clustering, and multi-tenancy; turning the open source Apache Tomcat project into Enterprise, Cloud-Native Tomcat++

 

 Step 1 – Deploy Carbon and Acquire Carbon Context

The SaaS application demonstrates tenant-specific framework objects, illustrates tenancy isolation, and reviews the Java Tenancy API within WSO2 Carbon.   The application code is available from GitHub at https://github.com/karux/CarbonSaaSTest.git

The Carbon Context object holds registry, cache, queue, user realm, and role based access control (RBAC) information for each tenant run-time context. Each SaaS application can use a Carbon platform API to access context details and personalize the application experience.

 

This blog tutorial and example code demonstrates the following getting started concepts and steps:

  • Getting Started #1 – Defining a Tenancy Dimension Model
    • Step 0: Deploy the WSO2 Application Server and start server
    • Step 1:  Log into the Carbon administration console as the super-administrator
  • Getting Started #2 – Provisioning SaaS Applications
    • Step 0: Compile the CarbonSaaSTest Application
    • Step 1: Provision a Global Tenant Scope SaaS Application
  • Getting Started #3 – Acquire Tenant Context

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Building Multi-tenant SaaS Applications

Multi-tenant SaaS applications deliver a personalized client experience while maximizing performance and efficiency.   Many teams are challenged by the specialized knowledge required to create a SaaS application on a legacy Java platform.  Creating SaaS applications requires detailed knowledge of multi-tenancy, contextual personalization, declarative programming, and infrastructure scaling.  The WSO2 Carbon platform contains unique Cloud-Native frameworks that decrease development challenges when building multi-tenant SaaS applications.

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